"'You can't even go to church now without having to think about segregation. What is this world coming to?'"

Ed King: At the same time, we began trying, to make whites feel at every level that there was something about desegregation that benefitted them, and that there were prices. So we went to every concert, every public event. We got a lot of them cancelled but we're hitting the churches on Sundays. We're going to their music concerts on Fridays and maybe even going to a jazz concert on Saturday night, pointing out that blacks aren't allowed. And having people arrested periodically at these places. In one of the big churches here, one Sunday morning, a friend of mine from Millsap was there, and we had friends helping, a lady sat down in front of me talking to another, and said now, "How about those dogs and police outside? They were at the city auditorium last night for a concert. You can't even go to church now without having to think about segregation. What is this world coming to?" That was where the safe minister was… the assumption was we had so much in common within the religions and most black churches, to the day he died, would never have let Martin King preach in their churches. Most black churches in the state, they would say I'm a white racist for saying it now, he certainly couldn't have appeared in those white churches, but most black churches would have been too afraid and too much into the same religion the whites were in...

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