"...I couldn't have done it if I had not had a prison record."

Ed King: ...so I interviewed the president of the college and was offered the job [as chaplain of Tougaloo College]. But it all happened very quickly. I was certainly aware that, you know, this was before Black Power days, but still the idea of a white chaplain at a black college was [ ], although many of the black colleges had a white president and they all had white faculties. The present chaplain of that time was white but the preceding chaplains for years had been black and the ones that I knew from my days at Millsap had been involved in the NAACP(National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), been involved with voter registration, the preceding chaplain had helped organize student sit-ins or at least [ ] the Jackson Library, he didn't help organize then, he at least looked aside and let it get done. So I couldn't have done it if I had not had a prison record. I mean the black students were suspicious in… she was at the idea of having a white southern chaplain but my prison record helped but I still thought that I would stay pretty much in the background but things happened so fast. Then {John Salter}, who's in on this suit against the ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union)and the press, Salter, who was another sociology teacher, he had been, he was the real advisor to the students. His wife was also an advisor to their NAACP chapter. But when the proceeding black chaplain had left, Salter, for a couple of years, had been the key movement person on the campus. I assumed he would stay that way. Well, I came in January of '63, left the seminary in the middle of the semester, Salter helped lead all of the direct action in Memphis but by August of '63 Salter had decided to leave the campus and go into full-time civil rights work full-time voter registration...

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