I really got my eyes opened...

Charles Marsh: ... you would have been in some ways sympathetic to the black situation before divinity school, before you began the seminary.

Duncan Gray:

But I must, I have to confess it wasn't a crusading issue with me, anything like that… In those days, the white liberal was the one who was deeply concerned about making sure blacks got a good education and that schools were up to standard.... he was deeply committed to...... separate but equal school accommodations. He was as much a segregationist as anyone in the world, but because he was always in there plugging for upgrading the black schools, he got the same tag, a liberal and all…

I guess I really got my eyes opened one way at that point… This was right after WWII, '48, and I was working with a guy in there who's steam cleaning a motor chassis… and got to talking with him, found out.... [he was] just as bright as he could be.... teach a kind of responsibilities in the military. He came out in Pittsburgh and just was about as menial and low category job as you could get. I really got to talking to him at [Summer Lake]... Actually, his experiences being stationed in the south had not been all that unpleasant and that he felt, in one sense, more discriminated against... I didn't expect to find that in Pittsburgh. This serious, more serious than I thought.

 

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