For the first time bloody Neshoba has had the red blood of black men and the red blood of white men enrich its soil.

Ed King: I come before you now, some of you know me, some of you don't,  I'm a Mississippian.  I'm the chaplain out of Tougaloo College.  I ran for lieutenant governor with Aaron Henry last fall, my wife is from Jackson, Mississippi.  My parents used to live in Mississippi before they were run out of Mississippi.  By the same kind of people who do this kind of thing and the silent people who I think are just as guilty and more are damned in their souls because they know it's wrong.  But I've said enough about the country, we'll just talk about Mississippi.  I come before you to say that brothers have killed my brothers.    For the first time bloody Neshoba has had the red blood of black men and the red blood of white men enrich its soil.  I don't think we will ever forget this.  Too often in Mississippi in these last 300 years Negro mothers, Negro wives, Negro brothers and sisters have had to cry alone have had to go into the white kitchen and wipe away the tears so that nobody would know it mattered when a person died.  But we are now saying that no longer will a person die in Mississippi and the world not know about it.  And this country and the people of this world not grieve with us.  If we can die together with Mississippi surely we can find a way to live together.  To grow together, to learn together, to love together.  This will take great strength, great courage that God alone can give.

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