Fannie Lou Hamer: The songs came rolling out of her heart, one after the other... she looked at you as though you knew it and then sang it to you and through you since it really didn't matter that you didn't.

Bob Moses: The Bible tells us so, you know this story. Then there came these two women who were harlots who came to the king and stood before him, you know how the story goes on, and when the king said "Divide the living child in two, and give half to the one and half to the other." Then spake the woman, whose the living child was, unto the king, for her bowels yearned upon her son, and she said, O my lord, give her the living child and ________." And then all of Israel saw that the wisdom of the Lord was in King Solomon to do judgment. But it was the mother of the living son who put her faculties into serious play: humility, the virtue of her heart, extinguishes her sense of separation and her bowels yearn upon her son. Capacity to surrender the virtue of her willpower releases her personal self to the will of the other mother, wisdom, the virtue of her mind, manifest in her command, give her the living command and in no wise land. She plays at the level where God also plays.

The doors are slamming now, and the little glass that's left are smashing on the freedom house floor, once more, once more, watch a weeping boy break a wailing wall and crawl away without a hand to hold, lie down, lie down, cover with the dark, Jesus Christ has cut his throat, there's nothing you can do.

And just who is this woman, sitting on this bus, singing away fear, where is she playing? It was August 31st, 1962, and I was on a school bus, leaving Ruleville, heading for Indianola, the county seat of Sunflower County. Amzie Moore had hooked up the bus for this first congregation of Mississippi Sharecroppers, domestic workers and day laborers to travel to the county seat to register to vote. The congregation was mostly middle-aged and older women and there was one woman who started to sing with the rolling of the bus and didn't stop until it stopped at the courthouse. The songs came rolling out of her heart, one after the other, back to back, from every country church that ever produced a choir, and every time she started a song, she looked at you as though you knew it and then sang it to you and through you since it really didn't matter that you didn't. It was her heart singing in all the minds of all the people on that bus to the county seat to register to vote for the first time in the life of the delta. Her heart planting in their minds her songs, one after the other, back to back, flooding out fear, the great mind-killer. Where was she playing? Humility, the virtue of her heart, extinguishes her sense of separation, and she reaches out with her songs, one after the other, right there Atlantic City, in August of 1964, just two years later, right there at the site of the national convention, to proclaim President Johnson the King of the Democratic Party. Right there on the boardwalk of Atlantic City. Fannie Lou Hamer. The revolutionary element remained in tact. They simply stood, she said, no sir, for emphasis, we didn't come for no two seats since all of us is tired.

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