"...children coming into Sunday school have to say, 'Mommy, what's the dog for? That doesn't look like Lassie. What's that paddywagon doing there and all those helmeted officers?'"

Ed King: Well, we felt there was some sympathy, but you had to reach others who might be more vulnerable and you had to find two things: the most vulnerable point, the weakest point in your opposition; that was their Christian conscience. But at the same time, it was finding their strongest point, which we felt was both Christian and nonviolent… and that we felt we weren't taking advantage of their weaknesses, it was their strength. At one of the churches here one Sunday, I talked to the minister the next morning and he was furious. He would've been a nice moderate, supportive of desegregation, some other place, some other century. Not a white racist. There were police outside his church, with dogs guarding his church but as he would say, 'I never asked them to be there.' Did you ever ask them to leave? 'I just didn't ask that they be there. That's the city's sidewalk.' And paddywagons parked so that children coming into Sunday school have to say, 'Mommy, what's the dog for? That doesn't look like Lassie. What's that paddywagon doing there and all those helmeted officers?' So we never had resources for their many church arrests, but we were taught that in church A, we might drive by church B,C,D to keep the police on guard there. Anyway, this poor man's church had not even been visited that day and said he had been attacked by members of his congregation who said that he had deliberately picked hymns that made them think about race relations, that his sermon was about race relations, and he said they even said the gospel lesson, and [he had] never had a hymn, a gospel or a sermon about this crisis… this is say Fall of 1963.