Fannie Lou Hamer

Type 
Book Chapter
Year 
1970
Creator(s) 
Container 
Pages 
92-106
Month or quarter 
June
Doc # 
1FH07.02
Abstract 

In this profile of prominent civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer, the author describes Hamer's upbringing in a poor sharecropping family in Mississippi and her subsequent leadership within the Civil Rights Movement.  Hamer grew up in Sunflower County, Mississippi, in impoverished circumstances, with very little food and other basic resources.  After marrying and experiencing continued racial prejudice on another plantation, Hamer became involved in civil rights activism, primarily through voter registration activities.  She did most of her voter registration activism through her work with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).  Because of her civil rights work, Hamer often endured harsh physical mistreatment by white police.  In this profile, Hamer described in detail one particularly gruesome beating that she endured in a jail from the police.  Hamer often felt that the Department of Justice and other government organizations that should have protected civil rights activists did not help them.  Hamer also co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP), an organization that fought to include civil rights in the Democratic political agenda.

Additional information 

Document Description: 14 page photocopy of document; located in PLT Archive folder "Fannie Lou Hamer"; Notations (written on photocopy): from Egerton.

Rights 
No copy available. Please contact us to make an appointment to visit the Project on Lived Theology paper archive.