Welcome to the Archive

During this extraordinary period in American History, the Civil Rights Movement, white conservatives, civil rights activists, black militants, black moderates and Klansmen all staked their particular claims for racial justice and social order on the premise that God was on their side. This digital resource in lived theology provides access to personal interviews with participants in and against the civil rights movement in addition to a wealth of bibliographic entries of documentary evidence from the time period that can be accessed in the Project on Lived Theology’s paper archive. This cohesive body of information demonstrates the struggles of peacemaking, community building, and lived theology during a pivotal moment in history.

To browse excerpts of interview data click on the tab "In Their Own Words" after choosing an entry from within one of the following categories:

In search of downloadable primary documents?
  • For all available downloadable documents, click on Documents and sort the document list by clicking on "File" twice
  • For all available full-length interviews, click on Interviews
  • For our Ed King collection, click on Documents and type "Ed King" into the "Creator" search box and hit "apply"
  • For our Freedom Now collection, click on Documents and type "Freedom Now" into the "Keyword" search box and hit "apply"
To search through over 1,000 documents, available for viewing in our paper archive located within the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia click on the following finding guides:
Click below for a more detailed site instructions, click on General Overview

This Month in Civil Rights

JuneDuring Freedom Summer on June 21, 1964, three civil rights workers disappeared: James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. They were found weeks later, murdered by conspirators who turned out to be local members of the Klan, some of them members of the Neshoba County sheriff's department. This outraged the public, leading the U.S. Justice Department along with the FBI (the latter which had previously avoided dealing with the issue of segregation and persecution of blacks) to take action. The public response to these murders helped lead to the passage of the Civil Rights Act.